Foreign Countries #23: Mystery and Imagination: Sweeney Todd (1970)

Anyone who watched the recent series The Yorkshire Ripper Files: A Very British Crime Story (2019) will know how misogynistic assumptions can hamper an investigation and an obsession with the killer can reduce their victims to statistics and social judgement that puts part of the blame on to themselves. After all, society says, what were … Continue reading Foreign Countries #23: Mystery and Imagination: Sweeney Todd (1970)

M4 Death Trip #6: Apostle (2018)

Bram Stoker Award Finalist Howard Ingham and I discuss Gareth Evans' (The Raid) Netflix Original Apostle and look at messy plots, undisciplined editing and atrocious dialogue. Along the way we discuss the London Film Festival, Korean missionaries and that time I bumped into Donald Sumpter after a West Ham game. Enjoy. https://www.podbean.com/media/player/83k6e-aaac8b?from=site&vjs=1&skin=1&fonts=Helvetica&auto=0&download=1

Crossing Miller’s: Re-evaluating Whistle and I’ll Come to You (2010)

I’ve previously talked about how any adaptation must serve the strengths of the medium ahead of a slavish retelling of the source text. But the elastic that connects Neil Cross’s adaptation to M.R. James’s most famous tale is stretched pretty much to breaking point. I was largely dismissive of this production upon initial broadcast; too … Continue reading Crossing Miller’s: Re-evaluating Whistle and I’ll Come to You (2010)

Foreign Countries Christmas Special: A Ghost Story for Christmas: The Dead Room (2018)

The latest effort in the on/off revival of the BBC's A Ghost Story for Christmas turns back to another original piece by Mark Gatiss. A slightly hammy, over-the-hill actor, Aubrey Judd (Simon Callow) reads ghost stories for the radio in the style of Appointment with Fear (1943-55) and its various successors. As he reads the … Continue reading Foreign Countries Christmas Special: A Ghost Story for Christmas: The Dead Room (2018)

Land of weather forecasts and breakfasts that set in #4: In Fabric (2018)

The other week I read a tweet that humorously suggested Batman and Daredevil would do well to swap their names. A similar thought went through my mind after seeing Peter Strickland’s In Fabric and wondering if it shouldn't do the same with Paul Thomas Anderson's Phantom Thread (2017). Strickland's films tend to be tactile affairs, … Continue reading Land of weather forecasts and breakfasts that set in #4: In Fabric (2018)